Changing Lives – Changing Futures

here Woodland Hall Academy has had the pleasure of seeing Chandler, our 2015-2016 graduate, grow from a 10 year old, who could not read all of his letters before he came to Woodland Hall Academy, into a young man graduating and entering college this fall. “Tallahassee Community College is a little harder than WHA.” Chandler tells us, but using the skills and study strategies he learned at WHA, he reported a 102 on his first Algebra test and a 90 on his first English paper.

http://shopmarketfair.com/2016/12/new-year-new-you-sticking-to-your-fitness-resolutions/ Chandler’s journey to college was not without struggles. When Chandler was 10 years old, he and his mother moved from Port St. Joe (PSJ) to attend Woodland Hall Academy because his public school teachers had given up on his learning to read. They suggested, even at this early age, that the best he could do in the future was a menial job. Yet, his parents saw him absorb information through the History and Science Channels and discuss topics such as WWII or biodiversity with adults.

http://thrivingparents.net/feeds/7863837539260365260/comments/default They refused to give up and found Woodland Hall.

Chandler’s mother says, “We did what we had to do. Chandler missed his dad who had to stay for work in PSJ. We traveled back and forth most weekends for 8 years. The struggle was worth it and we are smiling all the time now as we see Chandler becoming a responsible, great young man with a great future.”

cheap danazol medication Chandler is now a student at Tallahassee Community College and loving every minute of it. He is deciding whether to move towards a medical career or an engineering degree.  He has choices now, not constrained by a learning disability.

What made the difference? Woodland Hall Academy teaches students in the way they learn, instead of trying to force them into a mold that does not fit their learning pattern. The result – bright students who have struggled to learn are becoming successful students.  Dyslexia, ADHD, and related language disorders do not have to disable  children.